My goodness!

Sssh! The Week’s daily briefing reports:
OBAMA: MORE GOLF THAN ECONOMICS
US President Barack Obama has spent almost 1,000 hours on holiday and playing golf since he took office in January 2009 but has spent less than half that amount of time, 474.4 hours, in meetings about the economy. The claim comes in a report from the Government Accountability Institute, based on analysis of the presidential diary and newspaper reports.

20130429-163825.jpg

One thought on “My goodness!

  1. Miching Mallecho

    Note that 1000 hours is only 42 full days, or if you discount 8 hours sleep per night it is 56 days. If you tot it more realistically and say that any day in which the president spends a substantial block of time ‘out of office’ is a vacation day, you still only get to 80 or 90 days in four years.

    Apparently if Obama continues at his current rate, he will have taken 168 vacation days in the course of his eight years. Compare this with the last three presidents to have two terms: 297 for George W Bush; 174 for Bill Clinton; and a whopping 349 for Ronald Reagan.

    The comparison with the time spent in meetings about the economy is remarkably silly. What is the report saying? That the economy would be better off if the president spent more time in meetings about it? And why does the report relate his vacation time only to his meetings about the economy? What about his meetings about healthcare, national security, foreign policy, Guantanamo, the US military presence in the Middle East, disaster response, gun control, North Korea, trade agreements, law reform, appointments to public offices, bills for Congress…?

    Stop press! Another shocking exclusive: In the last four years President Obama has spent more time in the bathroom than at meetings concerning Tex-Mex border security! This is very likely true, but it is foolish and it tells us absolutely nothing about anything.

    The report you quote looks like it is taken straight out of the literature for Course 101: How to Lie with Statistics. The propensity to believe what it intimates appears to be directly proportional to the desire that it be true.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s